What we are looking for in your audition:

As directors, we have been asked to share information pertaining to the process of presenting a great audition. At the Palace Playhouse we look for four main items as we hold auditions for each theatre productions.


PRESENTATION: As each person presents him/herself on stage, the first 10 seconds
tells the most about the type of performer we are about to watch. We look for eye
contact, projection and enunciation while introducing him/herself and selections to
be presented. We look for stage presence, such as standing tall on both feet, eyes
engaged, confidence, and grooming.


MATERIAL SELECTION: Choosing a great song for each audition is key. It is best to
sing material that is similar in tone, mood, and personality to the musical for which
you will audition. For example, at the auditions for Newsies we heard great choices
from Matilda, Annie, and Junie B. Jones, which were more fitting than Gershwin
ballads or church songs.


ABILITY: Musical selections are required to have accompaniment. This shows
ability to match pitch, rhythm, and if the singer can produce volume. Monologues
give us the opportunity to see contrast in style and character of the one who
auditions.


ROLE PLACEMENT: Even when all the above have been met or have even excelled,
we still must look at the needs of the production. Considerations are made as to
how many to cast and costume, and how varying ages, sizes and shapes can be
utilized to fit the needs of the show.


There are many variables to consider when casting each production. Hours are spent going over the applications checking rehearsal conflicts and reviewing impressions from the audition. It is wonderful to watch children, teens, and adults participate. We are always grateful to each and every one from our talented community who choose to audition for a production at the Palace Playhouse.

 

What you should have prepared before you come to Auditions:

  • Come prepared to sing 16-32 measures from a Broadway musical similar to the scheduled production.  All audition songs are expected to be memorized.  Do not plan to sing an entire verse, only 32 measures are needed.  Lengthy music introductions should be eliminated.

 

  • Musical selection should reveal character, personality, vocal quality and range.

 

  • Musical auditions must be accompanied.  A cappella auditions will not be accepted.  Accompaniment can be live, keyboard, or electronic.  An accompanist will be available if needed, but it is always wise (if possible) to bring your own.  If you use electronic accompaniment, please eliminate lengthy introductions.

  • A short 30-second memorized monologue is recommended.  A monologue is not a poem.  It is a memorized selection spoken by a character from a musical or play, performed to reveal the character’s intent.

  • Please supply a personal resume.  If you do not have a completed resume, use the following link: AUDITION FORM, to print and fill out with your personal information to be submitted at the time of your audition at the Palace.

  • Date you know you have conflicts for both the rehearsal process and shows. 

White Christmas Auditions

Auditions for White Christmas the musical are September 21st and 22nd 7:30-9:00 PM at the Palace Theatre. If you would like to send a video audition please send it to thepalacetheatrepocatello@gmail.com. Accompanist, Aux, and iPhone hook-up will be available. All roles are available. Callbacks and dance auditions will be on Saturday by invitation only.

 

• Please prepare 16-32 bars of music in a similar style of the show.

• Please prepare a 60 second comedic monologue.

 

• This show is PG.

• All roles available

•Directed by Lisa Woodland

 

• Music Directed by Jason Bartosic

• Choreographed by Vanessa Grow

white christmas.jpg

Bob Wallace – (mid 30’s to early 40’s) – A major singing star, Bob is the guiding force behind the song and dance team of Wallace and Davis. He wears his fame easily, but has some trouble with social and romantic interactions. Despite occasional gruffness, he is a deeply kind and principled man who is searching for true love.

Excellent singer with a crooning style who moves very well. Tap and Jazz. Baritone.

 

Phil Davis – (mid 30’s to early 40‘s) – The fun-loving song-and-dance partner of the team Wallace and Davis. An irrepressible clown, operator, and incorrigible ladies’ man who is determined to see his friend happy, even if it requires scheming and outright deception. He has a boyish charm and sex appeal. Strong ballroom, jazz and tap-dancing needed. Baritone-tenor.

 

Betty Haynes – (mid-20’s to late 30’s) – Sensible, responsible half of the Haynes sisters act. Classic elegance. Destined to be a star, but hesitant to take the spotlight. Devoted to her sister. Hides a yearning for true love under a protective shell. Female singer of quiet beauty and charm with a rich chest mix and soprano extension. Must move well.

 

Judy Haynes – (mid-20’s to mid 30’s) – Younger, more ambitious and slightly scheming other sister. Wholesome and adorable, sexy and flirty. Strong jazz and tap dancer. Strong singer with a chest mix.

 

General Henry Waverly – (late 50’s to mid 60’s) – Retired Army general with a curmudgeonly military exterior, adjusting to retired life in post WW II America. Precise and orderly, struggling to run the Inn in Vermont. A man of integrity. Underneath a warm compassionate man in need of family and love. With the exception of one line, can be a non-singing role.

 

Martha Watson – (late 40’s to mid-60’s) – Once a Broadway star, now the General’s housekeeper. The true force behind running the Inn. Very dry wit and frank with a wisecracking sense of humor. Big hearted, but unsentimental. Irrepressible meddler, believing she acts on everyone’s best behalf.  Strong singer and mover, Broadway belter.

 

Susan Waverly – (young girl 9 to 12 to play 9 years old) – The General’s granddaughter. Lovable and outgoing. A bit precocious, but wise beyond her years. Gets bitten by the stage bug and is great at it. Excellent belt voice, must move very well.

 

Ralph Sheldrake – (mid 30’s to early 40’s) – Jokester Army buddy of Bob and Phil’s, now a major television executive. Fast talking, loud, brash New York professional with a good head on his shoulders.

 

Rita and Rhoda – (mid 20’s to early 30’s) – Bob and Phil’s two star chorus showgirls. Brash, sexy and fun. Perhaps not the brightest.

 

Ezekiel Foster – (mid 40’s to late 50’s) – Practical, the ultimate laid back New Englander. A man of few words. Caretaker at the Inn. Takes life at a very very leisurely pace.

 

Mike –(mid 20’s to late 30’s) – Bob and Phil’s Stage Manager. Can be overly dramatic and often hysterical, but gets the job done. Works to attempt a sense of control and order for the company. Doubles as Mr. Snoring Man, WInter Tourist

 

Tessie – (late 20’s to 30’s) Young Character woman to play Bob and Phil’s secretary, also plays Head Seamstress and Mrs. Snoring Man, winter tourist. Mezzo-soprano, belter.

 

Male and Female Ensemble of Dancers – (early 20’s to mid 30’s) to play assorted speaking roles as well as being a strong singing ensemble. Strong in Ballroom, Jazz and Tap. Dance style is 1950’s Hollywood movie musical style.

Four Band Singers, Backup vocalists seated onstage – 2 men, 2 women. Excellent singers who move well and can handle tight harmonies of the period.